Ice exposed in the trench on Sol 20
 (the designation of a day on Mars),
 had evaporated/sublimated away on Sol 24

It has been known for a while now that Mars, the red planet, has water ice from the poles down to latitudes of about 45 degrees. If humans ever go to Mars, they'll need to find water near the equator. Now it looks as if planetary geologists have found exactly this, as it was recently announced that there is evidence of water ice beneath the surface of Mars at tropical or sub-tropical latitudes as low as 25 degrees.
This data was acquired from the cameras mounted on Mars Express and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft, which have been orbiting the planet since 2004 and 2006, respectively.
This is great news for possible future exploration and/or settlement of our planetary neighbor, as we would obviously need water. We should soon find out if this announcement is correct, as one of the candidate landing sites for the Mars Science Laboratory, due for launch later this year, is the Holden Crater at a latitude of 26 degrees south. Hopefully this mission will give proof of water ice at these latitudes, as it is going to land in an area that is thought to have water ice just below the surface.
The subsurface ice could possibly be remnants of the last ice age on Mars. It appears that the ice ebbs with the seasons, with the polar ice caps increasing in size during their respective winters. It is also thought that the polar ice caps have varied in size over time, as Mars may have experienced its own ice ages.
It has been known for a while now that Mars, the red planet, has water ice from the poles down to latitudes of about 45 degrees. If humans ever go to Mars, they'll need to find water near the equator. Now it looks as if planetary geologists have found exactly this, as it was recently announced that there is evidence of water ice beneath the surface of Mars at tropical or sub-tropical latitudes as low as 25 degrees.
This data was acquired from the cameras mounted on Mars Express and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft, which have been orbiting the planet since 2004 and 2006, respectively.
This is great news for possible future exploration and/or settlement of our planetary neighbor, as we would obviously need water. We should soon find out if this announcement is correct, as one of the candidate landing sites for the Mars Science Laboratory, due for launch later this year, is the Holden Crater at a latitude of 26 degrees south. Hopefully this mission will give proof of water ice at these latitudes, as it is going to land in an area that is thought to have water ice just below the surface.
The subsurface ice could possibly be remnants of the last ice age on Mars. It appears that the ice ebbs with the seasons, with the polar ice caps increasing in size during their respective winters. It is also thought that the polar ice caps have varied in size over time, as Mars may have experienced its own ice ages.

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